• Fred's Blog

    Am I Content with Who I Am Becoming?

    Dear Shawn, I liked your question last week but it was so early in the morning. (Why do young men have Bible study before dawn?) Between the breakfast tacos and coffee my mind was not yet focused. But, I’ve been thinking about what you asked, “How do we keep from being conformed to the patterns of this world?” It’s the right question – with many good answers. I have found two disciplines – and they do not come naturally – that have helped. I call them “antidotes to conformity.” First, Paul taught the personal discipline of seeing ourselves clearly. He calls it “sober judgment,” and it is our responsibility to…

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  • Fred's Blog

    2 Chronicles 7:14 Isn’t About American Politics

    There is something in all of us that desires a king – whether it be the Israelites longing for a king to fight their battles or it be our looking forward to the “rightful king” C.S. Lewis describes in “Mere Christianity.” We see that being played out now in our turning the election of a President into the quest for a King who will fight our particular partisan battles for us. Sadly, it is those who have been brought up on the assumption that America is the new Israel who are being, as St. Paul said, “blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and…

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  • Fred's Blog

    I’ll Take My Chances

    In 1982, Mother Teresa was invited to Beirut in the middle of the worst part of the war between Israel and Lebanon – the Siege of Beirut. Her immediate visit was to a hospital for retarded and handicapped children where at least 10 had been killed by repeated mortar attacks. Reporters and veteran aid workers were skeptical and at first, many thought it was either a vain gesture or misguided idealism on her part. However, Mother Teresa and her nuns entered the Dar al-Ajaza al-Islamia Mental Hospital and carried out 37 of the most deformed and retarded children: “I have never been in a war before, but I have seen…

  • Fred's Blog

    I'll Take My Chances

    In 1982, Mother Teresa was invited to Beirut in the middle of the worst part of the war between Israel and Lebanon – the Siege of Beirut. Her immediate visit was to a hospital for retarded and handicapped children where at least 10 had been killed by repeated mortar attacks. Reporters and veteran aid workers were skeptical and at first, many thought it was either a vain gesture or misguided idealism on her part. However, Mother Teresa and her nuns entered the Dar al-Ajaza al-Islamia Mental Hospital and carried out 37 of the most deformed and retarded children: “I have never been in a war before, but I have seen…