Year: 2015

Introductory Remarks for 2015 Annual Meeting of the Philanthropy Roundtable Panel

There has been a recent flurry of articles by the World Bank, Nick Kristof in the New York Times, Andrew Mayeda in Benchmark and others about the progress in the elimination of extreme poverty in the world. Of course, there have been other articles, notably Jason Hickel writing in Al Jazeera that these reports have been intentionally distorted and based on faulty data. Whatever the case for the su ...[Read More]

Introduction for Michael Card – The Gathering 2015

The imaginative Bible teacher requires a particular sort of humility. Whereas the writer or the poet or artist can create with an almost totally free hand, the Bible teacher does not write the text. So, teaching comes with limitations that frustrate some and in their desire to be creative and not repeat what has been heard over and over again, they fall into the trap of distorting the text in ways ...[Read More]

Introduction for Kay Warren – The Gathering 2015

Maybe that’s just the right place to introduce Kay this evening because she has been down many roads over the last several years. C.S. Lewis said that a young man who wishes to remain a sound atheist cannot be too careful of his reading. There are traps everywhere – Bibles laid open, millions of surprises…fine nets and stratagems. God is, if I may say it, very unscrupulous.” It was one of th ...[Read More]

Introduction for Andrew Peterson – The Gathering 2015

Artists require a special quality of humility. Not the kind that denies their gift but that which is often surprised when the ideas, images, words and melodies first come to mind. Because, in the end, they do not create out of nothing. The best are those who know how much of their work is listening and then following the thread to see where it leads. When asked where his inspiration comes from And ...[Read More]

Opening Talk – The Gathering 2015

There are times when people ask what the theme of the conference is and without exception I tell them there never is an intentional theme.  We have no idea what the conference will be when we start thinking about next year. But sometimes a theme emerges that is totally unplanned and we are all surprised. Yet, this may be the first time in many years I have seen something ahead of time – but ...[Read More]

Tribute to Peggy Shipley

Bill’s request was for us to share a memory of Peggy. I know we have all laughed for years about her probing how I really felt about anything and everything. She wanted to go deep and I wanted to skip stones on the surface. However, it’s something else I want to say just now. I was 24 in 1970 when a friend took this picture. We had just climbed to the highest ridge of Wildcat Mountain ...[Read More]

Cardus Magazine Book Review: The Philanthropic Revolution

BOOK REVIEW: The Philanthropic Revolution by Jeremy Beer, Penn Press, June 2015.         As president of The Gathering—a community of individuals, families, and private foundations making financial gifts to Christian ministries around the world—for some time now, I often wonder if philanthropy is one of those words that has either lost its traditional definition (love of mankin ...[Read More]

Cardus Magazine Book Review: The Opposite of Spoiled

Book Review: The Opposite of Spoiled by Ron Lieber. HarperCollins, 2015. 320pp.           We all have a voice in our head that talks about money. For some it’s the haunting voice in D.H. Lawrence’s story “The Rocking-Horse Winner”—the voice saying: “There must be more money! There must be more money!” The children hear it when the elabor ...[Read More]

Review of “Why Philanthropy Matters” in Cardus Magazine

I can imagine Zoltan J. Acs waking up one recent morning to read the news that Harvard has embarked on a history making capital campaign to raise $6.5 billion by 2018 with almost half of that being targeted for university based research and development. “The Harvard campaign is critical to the university’s ability to fund important priorities going forward, but it is also an opportunity to redefin ...[Read More]

David Brooks at The Gathering: “How To Be Religious In The Public Square”

We’ve just witnessed the most heroic thing you will see this weekend because the biggest challenge in Mike’s life is leaving a podium. Wow. His fingerprints are actually – the nails – are still dug in here. I had forgotten about that purpose-driven, the Rick Warren column. Actually, having spent a couple days, few hours with you. I’m going to do not a purpose-driven life, but the chauffeured-drive ...[Read More]