Talks and Writings

Every conference begins with opening remarks and we’ve created an archive for those.  As well, introductions for speakers have been a way to give some added insight into the character and accomplishments of some extraordinary people.

Opening Remarks and Introduction: Michael Cromartie Memorial Dinner

What is now The Gathering began in 1985 with five of us who had an interest in Christian philanthropy. For the first several meetings of our small retreats at The Cedars in Arlington we had a strict rule.  There would be no presentations from non-profits.  In fact, no non-profit leaders would be invited to attend. No fund-raisers.  No one sitting in on the fringes.  Like any boys club, we took a b ...[Read More]

Opening Talk – The Gathering 2016

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.  Forgive them anyway. If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.  Be kind anyway. If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.  Succeed anyway. If you are honest and sincere people may deceive you.  Be honest and sincere anyway. What you spend years creating, others coul ...[Read More]

Introductory Remarks for 2015 Annual Meeting of the Philanthropy Roundtable Panel

There has been a recent flurry of articles by the World Bank, Nick Kristof in the New York Times, Andrew Mayeda in Benchmark and others about the progress in the elimination of extreme poverty in the world. Of course, there have been other articles, notably Jason Hickel writing in Al Jazeera that these reports have been intentionally distorted and based on faulty data. Whatever the case for the su ...[Read More]

Introduction for Michael Card – The Gathering 2015

The imaginative Bible teacher requires a particular sort of humility. Whereas the writer or the poet or artist can create with an almost totally free hand, the Bible teacher does not write the text. So, teaching comes with limitations that frustrate some and in their desire to be creative and not repeat what has been heard over and over again, they fall into the trap of distorting the text in ways ...[Read More]