1 Peter

1 Peter 4:12-5:14

1. There is some literature we assign to younger people that is good for them to read but impossible for them to understand. I think many of Shakespeare’s plays fit this category as well as the book of Ecclesiastes. I might even put Peter’s letters in that category. His letters to the young church are written from the perspective of an older and wiser man who has experienced a great deal of suffer ...[Read More]

1 Peter 4:1-11

After a few weeks in the book of 1 Peter we should have noticed that those to whom this letter was written were in far different circumstances than we are this morning. There are several ways we can read these passages about suffering, persecution and the end of the world. We can read this as history that describes a particular time and place that was real but is no longer the case. It’s a picture ...[Read More]

1 Peter 3:13-22

1. The early Christians saw themselves as living in the days of Noah. The culture was coarse, corrupt and full of violence. “The Lord saw how great man’s wickedness had become on the earth, and that every inclination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil all the time. The Lord was grieved that he had made man on the earth, and his heart was filled with pain…The earth was corrupt and full of v ...[Read More]

1 Peter 3:1-12

1. In the final chapter of John, Jesus tells Peter how he is to die – upside down. In a sense he also lived upside down from what he had been as a young man. The Apostle writing these letters is not the impulsive and proud person we meet in the Gospels. Instead, we see a man seasoned by age, circumstances and the Holy Spirit. Time and again, including the passage this morning, he talks about the v ...[Read More]

1 Peter 2:13-17

This morning we are going to look at the passage from the perspective of Paul in Romans 13 as well as Peter. It’s important to realize that the earliest Church fathers were in agreement about the relationship between the church and the government. The early church was not a revolutionary movement. It was not a conservative movement. It was a fellowship of foreigners and exiles living temporarily i ...[Read More]

1 Peter 2:1-12

In 2 Chronicles we read the stories of two kings: Josiah and Jehoiakim. They are father and son but they could not be more different in every way. Josiah became king at eight years old. When he was sixteen he “began to seek the God of his father David” and at twenty he began to purge Judah and Jerusalem of high places, carved idols and cast images. When he was twenty-six he began to re ...[Read More]

I Peter 1:1-12

Peter is writing to a church that enjoyed some initial success with fast growth and considerable popularity in the first days. However, that soon changed and Peter is now writing to a scattered population of believers who were forced by persecution to leave Jerusalem. 1.  Acts 2: “They enjoyed the favor of all the people”. Acts 8 – Stoning of Stephen: “On that day, a great persecution broke ...[Read More]

1 Peter 1:13- 25

This morning we are looking at the second half of the first chapter and I want to mention five or six things here. First, Peter is encouraging the early and scattered church to prepare their minds for action. Literally, he is saying stand “on the balls of your feet” and be ready to move. Don’t be flat-footed in the faith. It’s not enough to know more if we have lost the abi ...[Read More]

1 Peter 5:1-14

1. There is some literature we assign to younger people that is good for them to read but impossible for them to understand. I think many of Shakespeare’s plays fit this category as well as the book of Ecclesiastes. I might even put Peter’s letters in that category. His letters to the young church are written from the perspective of an older and wiser man who has experienced a great deal of suffer ...[Read More]

1 Peter 4:1-11

1.  We have a couple more complicated passages again this morning. What does it mean to suffer in the flesh and be done with sin? What does it mean to say the gospel was preached to those who are now dead? Let’s look at the first. “He who suffered in his body is done with sin” has sometimes been read to justify self-imposed suffering or physical pain and deprivation to increase holiness. The Catho ...[Read More]